A study of radon concentration in homes in the Sea to Sky corridor and the North Shore of Vancouver British Columbia

  • Misha Lu Author
  • BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health Institution
  • Dale Chen Supervisor
  • Anne Marie Nicol Contributor
Keywords: North Shore, Radon, Radon gas, Vancouver, Sea to Sky

Abstract

 

Background: Radon is odourless and colourless gas. It is the second leading cause of lung cancer and can only be found through testing. A radon potential map released in 2012 and highlighted various areas of British Columbia which were high in radon. This study focused on testing for radon gas in houses within the Sea to Sky Corridor and North Shore, areas noted to be high in radon. Methods: This study was conducted by reaching out to participants who lived within these areas. Radon test kits were distributed, and patrons were instructed to keep these kits on the lowest level of the home for at least 91 days. After the 91-day period, the radon test kits were collected and sent to a lab for further results. Results: The lab results were analysed with NCSS Data Analysis software. Three statistical tests were conducted looking at the different areas, types of foundation and if the houses tested are below the recommended average. Two of the two sample T tests were not significant, and the one sample T test came back significant. Conclusion: The two-sample t test (comparison against the two areas) showed that radon did not have equal concentrations. The same can be said with the two sample t tests against foundation types (slab on grade and crawl space). All samples were then compared against the recommend limit set by Health Canada (200 Bq/3), and was concluded that they were all below this limit.

 

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Published
2019-04-01
How to Cite
Lu, M., BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health, Chen, D., & Nicol, A. M. (2019). A study of radon concentration in homes in the Sea to Sky corridor and the North Shore of Vancouver British Columbia. BCIT Environmental Public Health Journal. https://doi.org/10.47339/ephj.2019.52
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