Association of electronic cigarette usage and nicotine consumption frequency of young adults in British Columbia

  • Adora Kwong Author
  • BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health Institution
  • Dale Chen Supervisor
Keywords: British Columbia, Electronic cigarette, E-cigarettes, nicotine, young adults

Abstract

Background Electronic e-cigarette ever users has been increasing as of 2015, the most prevalent ever users being young adults aged 20-24 years old. The implication of e-cigarette ever user developing into long term users is a emerging public health concern. Methods Electronic cigarette usage frequency and nicotine consumption was measured through a self-administered online survey of young adults (n= 54). Survey was advertised through social media sites between January 2019 till February 2019. Descriptive and inferential statistic was conducted using NCSS 12 to examine the association between electronic cigarette usage and nicotine consumption. Results Among young adults aged 19 to 24 years old, the frequency of e-cigarette usage was 51% high usage, 31% no usage and 16% medium and low usage. For nicotine consumption, respondents were 25% daily, 40% no use, 18% infrequent, and 14.8% frequent. Conclusion There is an association between more frequent electronic cigarette usage and higher nicotine consumption among young adults in British Columbia. Frequency e-cigarette users were found to consumption nicotine at higher frequency then non users. Further research is needed to fully understand the extent of the relationship of if e-cigarette usage promotes daily nicotine consumption or daily nicotine consumption results in higher e-cigarette usage.

 

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Published
2019-01-01
How to Cite
Kwong, A., BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health, & Chen, D. (2019). Association of electronic cigarette usage and nicotine consumption frequency of young adults in British Columbia. BCIT Environmental Public Health Journal. https://doi.org/10.47339/ephj.2019.35
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Articles