Knowledge comparison between group childcare centres and family childcares on sanitation of toys

  • Yun Ha (Sammie) Hwang Author
  • BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health Institution
  • Helen Heacock Supervisor
  • Fred Shaw Contributor
Keywords: Childcare, Group, Family, Children, Toys, Sanitation, Public health, Knowledge

Abstract

 

Background: Childcare facilities (CCFs) are known to have a high potential risk of exposure and transmission of infectious diseases through contact surfaces, such as toys. Research to date suggests that toys are a potential source of cross-infections in CCFs, especially when childcare providers do not practice proper hygiene. Currently, there is a lack of knowledge on the differences in sanitation methods of toys between group and family CCFs. This study compared knowledge of group and family CCFs regarding how to sanitize toys. Methods: Self-administered surveys were distributed to group and family CCFs in Surrey, BC via e-mail. The survey was used to assess the knowledge of childcare providers on sanitation of toys. The survey was evaluated using a scoring system. In addition, each participant answered descriptive questions, such as the existence of sanitation plans and toy cleaning and sanitizing schedules. Results: Group and family CCFs showed no statistically significant differences in knowledge levels on sanitation of toys. The mean score of the knowledge level of group and family CCFs was 65% and 55% respectively. Conclusion: Childcare providers in CCFs play a key role in properly sanitizing toys and preventing transmission of infectious diseases between children. Recognizing knowledge gaps in sanitation can lead to policy development as well as improved educational programs.

 

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Published
2017-05-01
How to Cite
Hwang, Y. H. (Sammie), BCIT School of Health Sciences, Environmental Health, Heacock, H., & Shaw, F. (2017). Knowledge comparison between group childcare centres and family childcares on sanitation of toys. BCIT Environmental Public Health Journal. https://doi.org/10.47339/ephj.2017.83
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Articles